unwrapping
unwrapping:

Start 2013 by tracking your Tumblr numbers. Analytics tool Numblr underwent a rehaul recently and now offers a Numblr score from 10 to 100. That score relies on three measures: 
Note-to-post ratioCompares Tumblr notes received to your number of original content posts (reblogs do not count). 
Content longevityBased on the duration between publish date and date of the latest note; the longer the time, the better. 
Post frequencyAverage number of posts per day. Post too often and you may receive less notes; post sporadically and you may not gain a following to drive notes.

unwrapping:

Start 2013 by tracking your Tumblr numbers. Analytics tool Numblr underwent a rehaul recently and now offers a Numblr score from 10 to 100. That score relies on three measures: 

  • Note-to-post ratio
    Compares Tumblr notes received to your number of original content posts (reblogs do not count).
     
  • Content longevity
    Based on the duration between publish date and date of the latest note; the longer the time, the better.
     
  • Post frequency
    Average number of posts per day. Post too often and you may receive less notes; post sporadically and you may not gain a following to drive notes.
yourhealthista

Wedding Dress Shopping: Health for a Wedding vs. a Marriage

yourhealthista:

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As I mentioned in this post, I’m getting married in the spring at two separate ceremonies (one in Mexico over Memorial Day weekend and one in my hometown three weeks later).

You can ask any of my friends to verify this, but I’ve never been a wedding person. I’ve never fantasized about my own wedding, never gotten addicted to any of the seemingly omnipresent wedding shows on TLC, never read wedding blogs, and to be honest, never really saw myself having a wedding in the conventional sense. I always said, “If my husband-to-be wants to have a wedding, we can have one. But I don’t need one.”

Well, guess what? My husband-to-be wants a wedding. Don’t get me wrong: he would be completely fine eloping or just taking our families to a nice dinner after a courthouse ceremony, but he’d definitely rather have a wedding. Okay, cool. I can do that.

Once I dipped a toe into the wild, wild world of weddings, I realized I didn’t know anything about them. Not having been a “wedding person” growing up was actually kind of a disadvantage. Suddenly not only did I need to find a venue, a caterer, a florist, etc., etc., etc., but I also had to find THE dress — and look the best I’ve ever looked in it. Talk about pressure, right?

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yourhealthista

The Top 7 Myths about Crossfit and Why They’re Totally FALSE

yourhealthista:

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I understand that Crossfit isn’t for everyone. I GET IT. But don’t let the myths about Crossfit give you an excuse not to try it, okay? If you’re even a little bit interested, I would highly recommend trying it at least 4-5 times (once isn’t really enough to get a good feel for it). It’s literally changed my life.

Myth #1: Crossfit is only for super-fit people.

Entirely untrue. One of the best and most amazing things about Crossfit is that it’s scalable to any level. I think people hear that and don’t believe it, but it’s true. We have people of all ages, shapes, and abilities at my box, and the most wonderful thing is that everyone cheers everyone else on. I’m genuinely happy when my friends get PRs or push themselves to new heights. Warm and fuzzy feelings abound in Crossfit!

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So obviously, Camille is super-fit. But you don’t have to be to get a LOT out of Crossfit!

Myth #2: Crossfit is expensive.

Crossfit is only expensive if you compare it to regular gyms. It’s CHEAP when you compare it to the cost of personal training, which to me, is a more apt comparison. I paid around $700 for three months of personal training at one 60-minute session per week. Crossfit costs anywhere between $150-300/month, depending on where you live, but you can go as many times as you want. Since each session is like a group personal training session, it actually costs about half as much as you’d get charged at a standard gym!

Myth #3: Crossfit is a cult.

GAHHHHH, I’m so sick of hearing this. Crossfit is a cult as much as any group of people interested in the same thing is a cult! We all like talking about Crossfit when we’re together because we all DO Crossfit. If you got together with a bunch of coworkers outside of work, isn’t it likely that you’d spend at least part of the time inadvertently talking about work? Same concept. It’s what we all have in common, so it’s easy to talk about!

Keep reading for Myths #4-7!

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